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Socio-demographic Influences to Ethnobotanical Knowledge among the Residents of Mt. Kitanglay at Initao, Misamis Oriental

International Journal of Science and Management Studies (IJSMS)
© 2024 by IJSMS Journal
Volume-7 Issue-1
Year of Publication : 2024
Authors : Michael James O. Baclayon, Ramon Francisco Q. Padilla, Hannah Marielle V. Sindayen, Jeanbee D. Gutierrez, Magdalena D. Dulay, Aida D. Perpetua, Sonnie A. Vedra
DOI: 10.51386/25815946/ijsms-v7i1p117
Citation:
MLA Style: Michael James O. Baclayon, Ramon Francisco Q. Padilla, Hannah Marielle V. Sindayen, Jeanbee D. Gutierrez, Magdalena D. Dulay, Aida D. Perpetua, Sonnie A. Vedra "Socio-demographic Influences to Ethnobotanical Knowledge among the Residents of Mt. Kitanglay at Initao, Misamis Oriental" International Journal of Science and Management Studies (IJSMS) V7.I1 (2024): 110-119.

APA Style: Michael James O. Baclayon, Ramon Francisco Q. Padilla, Hannah Marielle V. Sindayen, Jeanbee D. Gutierrez, Magdalena D. Dulay, Aida D. Perpetua, Sonnie A. Vedra, Socio-demographic Influences to Ethnobotanical Knowledge among the Residents of Mt. Kitanglay at Initao, Misamis Oriental, International Journal of Science and Management Studies (IJSMS), v7(i1), 110-119.
Abstract:
A descriptive research design was conducted through purposive samplingto document the socio-demographic information in relation to ethnobotanical knowledge among the residents of Mt. Kitanglay, Initao, Misamis Oriental. A participatory community discussion (PCD) was used as the research tool with some modification such as asking the basic socio-demographic information of the participants. Sampling areas were at Brgy. Aluna (S1), Brgy. Kamelon (S2) and Brgy. Tawantawan (S3) in the municipality of Initao. A total of 90 participants composed of mostly elders with experience in herbal medicine healing and treatment. Results show that majority of the participants are females, 40-49 years old, married with 5-7 children, elementary graduate, and farming as main livelihood with family monthly income of Php 9,000 to Php 11,000 and annual income of Php 25,000 to Php 30,000. The data concluded that the residents’ ethnobotanical knowledge is still present among them. However, it shows a relative decline of knowledge among the younger generation due to lack of interest and the presence of available synthetic medicines from local health centers. Hence, there is dire need to increase awareness among local constituents, government and scientific communities for the preservation of medicinal species and the ethnomedicinal knowledge in Mt. Kitanglay at Initao, Misamis Oriental.
Keywords: Ethnobotany, Mt. Kitanglay, Tropical Herbal Medicine.
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